Most annoying mispronunciation

Joe   Tuesday, December 21, 2004, 01:02 GMT
On that pronunciation sample of dial, isn't what she pronounced one syllable? Because that's exactly the same way I pronounce it. Tile as well.

It sounded like two syllables to me. Short, but still two syllables.
Annabelle Morison   Tuesday, December 21, 2004, 01:03 GMT
Steve, Joe, Tiffany, here's something that I believe is extremely cute. I have the Disney movie "The Rescuers" on video, and I want you to try and see if you can tell what these mysterious accents might be. The swamp rat Ellie Mae is voiced by Jeanette Nolan, who I believe is from Los Angeles, California. One of Ellie mae's quotes is, "You Need a boat! Evinrude's got the fastest boat around here! Evinrude! Wake Up! Start up your engine boy!" When I heard this quote, Here's what I heard her say. "You Need a Boot! Even Rude's got the Fastess Boot Round Heeya! Even Rude! Wake Up! Start ope yeeingin Boy!" When she pronounced it, the E in Evinrude sounded more like the E in Screen. When she said Start up your engine, it sounded more like start ope yeeingin. Joann said that it was perhaps a Faux Southern Accent. To Me, it sounded more European Or Asian. Another Quote I remember is when Bianca, voiced by Eva Gabor, coaxed Evinrude to speed up when she said, "Faster, Evinrude, Faster!" However, when I tried to translate what she said, it came out sounding more like, "Fásta, Aven Rude, fásta!" The E in Evinrude sounded more like the A in Avenue, and the A in Faster sounded more like the A in Father. What could it have been?
Tiffany   Tuesday, December 21, 2004, 01:11 GMT
Then I do pronounce it with two short syllables. Thanks for helping me clear that up!
Someone   Tuesday, December 21, 2004, 01:50 GMT
I pronounce "toward" as "tord".
Damian   Tuesday, December 21, 2004, 09:22 GMT
Sorry guys and girls....I missed this thread and the replies.

Annabelle: I'm so glad you have heard of us..we are not easily missed you know..especially when the one o'clock gunfire from the ramparts shatter your eardrums.

OK...if you all just say: "Eddin-bruh" (2 short sharp syllables) we will still love you as ever.

Bob: sweet guy you are, as ever...I am warming to you. We have discreet ways of phlegm disposal but I will not go into detail here. ;-)
Easterner   Tuesday, December 21, 2004, 13:08 GMT
Damian,

Without wanting to push this too far, is there actually a /x/ sound at the end of Edinburgh when pronounced by locals? (sorry if you have already been asked this question earlier)
Annabelle Morison   Tuesday, December 21, 2004, 16:32 GMT
Damion, if you're good with names and origins, Let me ask you this. Have you ever heard of the name Evinrude? What is its origin and meaning? My Uncle Bruce, who lives in England, said that the origin of this name might be Norwegian, but he was not 100 percent sure. He also said that he doesn't know what the name means, if it means anything. However, Somebody told me that it might mean "Swift Fish" or "Swift Boat", since the first part of the name, Evin, is Irish and means "Swift". . One of the things that strikes me as mysterious about this name is how some people pronounce it. To the best of my knowledge, Evinrude is pronounced with the E as in "Weather" and the Oo as in "Cool". When Jeanette Nolan voiced the part of the swamp rat Ellie Mae on the disney Movie "The Rescuers", one of her quotes was, "You Need a boat! Evinrude's got the fastest boat around here! Evinrude! Wake Up! Start up your Engine Boy!" When I first heard this quote, here's what I thought I heard her say. "You Need a Boot! Even Rude's got the fastice Boot Round Heeya! Even Rude! Wake Up! Start Ope Yeeingin Boy!" When Ellie Mae pronounced it, the E in "Evinrude" sounded more like the E in "Screen". Joann said that the accent was perhaps a Faux Southern Accent. To me, however, the accent sounded more like it was of European roots. When Bianca, voiced by Eva Gabor, tried to coax Evinrude to speed up in his boat, she said, "Faster, Evinrude, Faster!" However, when I heard it, I really thought she said something like, "Fásta, Aven Rude, Fásta!" With Her Accent, the E in "Evinrude" sounded more like the A in "Avenue", and the A in "Faster" sounded more like the A in "Father". Can you solve these mysteries for me?
Alex Knibb   Wednesday, December 22, 2004, 14:23 GMT
My personal bugbear is, ironically, the pronunciation of the word "Espresso", as in coffee. The number of people who say "Expresso" is quite unfathomable.
Annabelle Morison   Wednesday, December 22, 2004, 15:16 GMT
I'm right there with you, Alex. I've heard more people pronounce it "Expresso" than I've heard some pronounce it "Espresso". To hammer home this Idea, I have a cousin whose name is pronounced as "Steffan", but he spells it as "Stephen". So when he goes to school, half of the time, his teachers would call him "Stephen", rather than "Steffan".