British accent

Rene   Wed Apr 18, 2007 6:13 pm GMT
Its really interesting what you were saying about Cornwall. My town was actually founded by Cornish miners (was in fact about 75% Cornish and the second or third largest mining community in California, although it is now middle of nowhere territory). I did a lot of studying into Cornish customs to see if any of them still existed in my town. Quite a lot do actually, we still celebrate St. Piran's day and the brass band goes around playing on the streets during the holidays in order to get free drinks from the local bars. Pastys are still a food staple (as a side note when I first moved here I thought that the shops that sold them: there are about five in town, were selling pasties. I was like, "my gosh for a little community this place sure has a lot of stripper shops!"). the pastys were apparently good for taking down into the mine. The town also hosts a "Cornish Christmas" each year. The streets are lined with people singing and playing old Cornish tunes, venders sell pastys, and it is a bit of an arts and crafts exposition. All of the venders and performers have to be dressed in costume. To be sure, it is mild compared to the twelve days of Christmas in old Cornwall, with the mummers plays, costumes, drinking, all night partying, etc. Still, the town does give a wink and a nod to the Cornish hard rock miners who founded it, although it's probably more for the sake of tourism than anything.
Damian in Edinburgh   Wed Apr 18, 2007 10:39 pm GMT
Rene:

All of Cornwall's tin mines and clay workings have now closed down - only of historical and tourist value now. The one at Tintagel, close to the old ruined castle of King Arthur on top of a cliff in the area called Camelot, was very deep and went out for a couple of miles under the sea.

St Piran's Day celebrations have been revived in Cornwall in processions and parades take place every 05 March. Helston still sees the annual Floral Dance celebrations with thousands of people all doing the Helston Floral Dance through the streets of the town.

We had some really nice Cornish pasties down there - the proper ones made with the proper ingredients, but when we went to Boscastle (the village that was devasted by a flash flood in a massive thunderstorm the year before we went there but totally restored by the time we were there) we had the most horrible pasties. They were gross, but all the others we had in Cornwall more than made up for them.

I love Cornwall - I want to go back down there one day soon.
Choco Gal   Thu Apr 19, 2007 4:16 am GMT
Is England English the same as England British?
Josh Lalonde   Thu Apr 19, 2007 8:40 pm GMT
<<Is England English the same as England British?>>

I think you meant 'English English' and 'British English'. If you did, then the answer is no. The term British English includes Welsh, Scottish, and Northern Irish varieties that are distinct from English English varieties. And of course there are many different types of English English.
Damian in Edinburgh   Fri Apr 20, 2007 9:11 pm GMT
I always say English English when referring to any English accent, but if it's specifically an RP type English English accent then I indicate RP. This area is overwhelmingly Scottish English, as you would expect, but the Edinburgh version.

Talking of Edinburgh - just as a sideline - this is roughly my commute to work route on a winter morning through the Edinburgh city centre, speeded up somewhat:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTK2DIeik6s&mode=related&search=
Jim   Sat Apr 21, 2007 10:59 pm GMT
inserting rs in places for a posh accent or southern accent ie barth for bath etc
Phil   Sun Apr 22, 2007 10:38 am GMT
Rene, does a "Cornish Christmas" involve eating loads of Cornish Pasties?.
Guest   Sun Apr 22, 2007 11:09 am GMT
>>Talking of Edinburgh - just as a sideline - this is roughly my commute to work route on a winter morning through the Edinburgh city centre, speeded up somewhat:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XTK2DIeik6s&mode=related&search= <<

Too much traffic for an evening!
Rene   Mon Apr 23, 2007 4:10 pm GMT
"Rene, does a "Cornish Christmas" involve eating loads of Cornish Pasties?."

You're darn right. I'm glad you got to eat some good ones Damian because I've eaten some really bad ones (and actually cooked some really bad ones, but then I made the recipe up in my head, crust and all, so I can't be blamed if the first batch was really terrible). As a side note, there is an old legend that the devil himself would never go into Cornwall because he was afraid that he would end up in a pasty. Also, the miners used to have there wives or whoever cooked for them if they didn't do it themselves initial the edge of the pasty. They left the small piece of the pasty with their initials in the mine so that the knockers (mischeivious little men rather like Irish leprachauns) would know who left it and would not harm the miners.
Uriel   Tue Apr 24, 2007 1:40 am GMT
You may not want to live your life in Penance, Damian, but here you can at least go skiing in Purgatory....Purgatory, Colorado.
O'Bruadair   Tue Apr 24, 2007 5:27 pm GMT
Well I’ll just be John Brown.

Really didn’t understand what a “pasty” was till I looked it up in Wikipedia. The thing looks and is made exactly like my granny’s (and every other good Southern cook’s) “fried apple pies”. Here is the description.

“Traditionally, pasties have a semicircular shape, achieved by folding a circular pastry sheet over the filling. One edge is crimped to form a seal”

Only differences as I understand it are the filling (traditional in Cornwall seems to be meat and/or vegetables while ours is generally some kind of fruit) and the fact that the Cornish versions are baked and ours are deep fried. (like just about everything else in the South)

Gotta be a link there somewhere.
Damian in Edinburgh   Tue Apr 24, 2007 9:35 pm GMT
Uriel: Yes, why not - I feel I'll head that way one day (a very long toime from now hopefully)......bound to, so why not go the whole way - - Penance and Purgatory - all of it in one go in Hell......Norway. All related to somewhere not too far from you...Truth or Consequences, all following on from each other! :-) And all because of a night in a certain township in Austria.

http://www.answers.com/topic/hell-norway

http://googlesightseeing.com/2007/01/16/fucking-austria/
Uriel   Wed Apr 25, 2007 6:16 am GMT
“Traditionally, pasties have a semicircular shape, achieved by folding a circular pastry sheet over the filling. One edge is crimped to form a seal”

Dude, that's an empanada!

<<All related to somewhere not too far from you...Truth or Consequences, all following on from each other!>>

Well, just don't try to fill up your tank in T or C -- they seem to feel that motorists on I-25 all need to feel those consequences in the form of exorbitant gas prices! (The entire town -- all three gas stations -- all in fiendish cahoots with each other!)

<<Only differences as I understand it are the filling (traditional in Cornwall seems to be meat and/or vegetables while ours is generally some kind of fruit) and the fact that the Cornish versions are baked and ours are deep fried. (like just about everything else in the South)>>

Reminds me of a Southern joke:

Why don't Southerners eat salad?

--Because you can't deep-fry it.

And good lord, boy, have you never heard of a Natchitoches meat pie? Louisiana specialty! (So is the pronunciation -- "Nackadish".)
Guest   Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:17 am GMT
Why don't Southerners eat salad?

--Because you can't deep-fry it.


is this a joke? where is the funny part? I am going to sleep, pls FEDEX it to my mailing address.
Guest   Wed Apr 25, 2007 11:25 am GMT
Because apparently everything in Scotland is deep fried. Old story...
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/scotland/4103415.stm