2:05

Guest   Fri Jun 15, 2007 11:33 pm GMT
I once heard a nonnative speaker constantly pronounce this time as "two five" instead of "two oh five" which sounded really odd to me. Does anyone have any idea why?
Jinnie   Sat Jun 16, 2007 12:34 am GMT
I say it like this: two hundred five hours
Lynda   Sat Jun 16, 2007 3:21 pm GMT
I've heard some people say it like that. They say it's because it's quicker somewhat.
Guest   Sat Jun 16, 2007 3:52 pm GMT
There's a zero in "2:05", hence "two oh five" is correct. If they're going to say it as "two five", they should also write it as "2:5".
Uriel   Sat Jun 16, 2007 6:40 pm GMT
Nobody would leave out the O in the US -- it would always be two-oh-five or five after two, witht he first one being more common.
Jim   Sun Jun 17, 2007 6:26 pm GMT
Same in Australia though we'd used "past" rather than "after". "Two five" sounds wtong to me.
Franco   Mon Jun 18, 2007 12:14 am GMT
You probably heard wrong. If 'two oh five" is said very rapidly, its hard to see hear the difference.

My fat retarded wife says it so.
Brit   Mon Jun 18, 2007 4:16 pm GMT
It's five past two.
Travis   Mon Jun 18, 2007 4:25 pm GMT
>>Nobody would leave out the O in the US -- it would always be two-oh-five or five after two, witht he first one being more common.<<

At least here, it is practically always "two-oh-five" except in more formal speech, where it may then be "five after two".
Lorn Mower   Wed Jun 20, 2007 12:49 am GMT
My grandmother say 2.25 as "five and twenty past two" but I'd say that as twenty-five past two. Does anyone else tell the time like my gran?
furrykef   Wed Jun 20, 2007 12:54 am GMT
I've never heard anybody say it like that, no. Numbers like 25 used to be pronounced like "five and twenty" (there's that nursery rhyme that includes the phrase "four and twenty blackbirds"), but I've never heard anybody use that construction as if it were ordinary.

- Kef
Pauline   Wed Jun 20, 2007 12:57 am GMT
It's how you say this numbers in dutch and german:

vijfentwintig / f├╝nfundzwanzig (""five and twenty")

Maybe you must write them different than this (for example with - or spaces) but I think they're correct.
Robert   Wed Jun 20, 2007 8:46 pm GMT
In Japanese, 2:05 is "ni-ji go-fun" -- that is, [two] [o'clock] [five] [minute(s)].