Embassy errors

Position   Mon Sep 11, 2006 8:20 pm GMT
<Well, in that case, Position, there's nothing grammatically incorrect about that sentence to me. >

You are saying that it is OK to use the present perfect with adverbs that describe finished/completed time, right?
j   Tue Sep 12, 2006 6:32 am GMT
'You are saying that it is OK to use the present perfect with adverbs that describe finished/completed time, right?'

Right. Sometimes it's OK. Such things can be very subtle. It depends on context.

Here is a paragraph from the lesson of Present Perfect from the Advanced English Lessons site - Englishpage. com. It's marked IMPORTANT:

'Sometimes we want to limit the time we are looking in for an experience. Expressions such as "in the last week," "in the last year," "this week," "this month," "so far" and "up to now" can be used to narrow the time we are looking in for an experience.
'
Guest   Tue Sep 12, 2006 6:42 am GMT
Except that in this context, it's wrong to use a perfect tense, j.
j   Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:56 am GMT
"The UK police, acting with the security service, MI5, have carried out a major counter-terrorism operation on 10 August..."

It has just recently happened, this is why a perfect tense's used. The exact time is not important, anyway it's mentioned here just because this is an official website, they ought to be precise.
I believed Uriel:"in that case, Position, there's nothing grammatically incorrect about that sentence to me."
Geoff_One   Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:34 am GMT
Change "through" to "via" or "by means of".

And what about changing "disrupt" to "stop"?
Guest   Tue Sep 12, 2006 10:45 am GMT
You can believe what you want, j, but you're still not right.

Anyway, judging by your last post, I would say you're not a native speaker. Am I right? Your sentences seem a bit strange.
Geoff_One   Tue Sep 12, 2006 12:30 pm GMT
I would start it off as:

The UK police, acting with security service MI5, carried out ...

This does not necessarily mean other versions are incorrect.
j   Tue Sep 12, 2006 4:33 pm GMT
Guest says: 'judging by your last post, I would say you're not a native speaker. Am I right? Your sentences seem a bit strange.'

I never try to hide this. This' is why I don't give Position my PERSONAL opinion, but instead:
1.find an excerption which confirms my opinion,
2.quote Uriel who's helped me on this forum countless number of times.

What really sounds strange to me that's your very mild words of MY English: - 'Your sentences seem a bit strange.'

Only a BIT strange??? I don't think so. Anyway I would be appreciate if you point out what exactly seems strange to you in my short (previous) post. Thank you in advance.
Guest   Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:01 pm GMT
Well, now you've made some more obvious mistakes in that post, but your last post was pretty good.

"It has just recently happened, this is why a perfect tense's used."
First of all, the punctuation in this sentence is wrong. That comma should be a period or semicolon. This mistake doesn't have much to do with you not being a native speaker, though...

"anyway it's mentioned here just because"
I would say "but it's mentioned here anyway because".

"this is an official website, they ought to be precise. "
Perhaps "so they ought to be precise" would be better. Otherwise, it doesn't flow too well.

"I believed Uriel"
You mean "I believe Uriel.", unless of course you no longer believe her.

"excerption"
I think you mean "excerpt".

"on this forum countless number of times."
That should be "countless times" or "a countless number of times".

"What really sounds strange to me that's your very mild words of MY English"
"What really sound strange to me are your mild words about my English." would be the gramatically correct way of saying that, but it's still somewhat unnatural. Maybe "What's really strange to me is how mild your words about my English were." would be better.

"Anyway I would be appreciate if you point out"
Corrected: "Anyway, I would appreciate it if you would point out" or "Anyway, I would appreciate it if you pointed out" (slightly less polite)

You're welcome.
j   Tue Sep 12, 2006 8:22 pm GMT
j says:
'find an excerption which confirms my opinion, '

Guest says:
"excerption"
I think you mean "excerpt".
======
Why?

<excerpt
One entry found for excerpt.

Function: transitive verb

1 : to select (a passage) for quoting : EXTRACT
[...]

- ex┬Ěcerp┬Ětion - noun >
Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
Guest   Wed Sep 13, 2006 1:32 am GMT
Strange. I've never heard of "excerption" and it doesn't show up in the American Heritage dicitonary. Maybe it's an uncommon usage?
Uriel   Wed Sep 13, 2006 6:28 pm GMT
The noun form I'm familiar with is "excerpt". Same as the verb.