Arabic & Chinese

Guest   Mon Aug 25, 2008 4:54 pm GMT
Some people say that Arabic and Chinese will be more important. However other people say the opposite.

What do you think about these languages?
Fidel Castro   Mon Aug 25, 2008 5:39 pm GMT
Arabic is not a language, people can't even understand each other, and Chinese is too difficult for anyone to learn it properly, very few people can actually have a simple conversation.
Jan from Holland   Mon Aug 25, 2008 6:15 pm GMT
Arabic is the language of some Third World countries, Islam and international terrorism. Anybody from these countries who has some education learns English. Anybody who has no education sticks with Arabic. So I won't bother with learning Arabic at all.

Chinese is too difficult to learn. There are 100.000 characters to learn and 1000 possibilities to pronounce a single syllable and if you make a slight pronunciation mistake it will change the meaning of the sentence completely!
For example:
You want to say "Thank you very much for inviting me to your house." to a Chinese, but you make some pronunciation mistakes and you say something like "First I will rape your wife, and then I will eat your dog, or the other way round"
If you aren't as a Chinese native speaker you need approx. 50 years to learn this language to a level, where you talk in simple sentences to native speakers, without having them to laugh at you or kick you in the balls after only 2 sentences.
And you have to keep in mind one thing:
The Chinese guys are the ones who want to sell something in Europe or America, so they have to speak in the language of these areas! They can't force their language to the whole world.
Guest   Mon Aug 25, 2008 7:03 pm GMT
So, according to your point of view, only English, German, Spanish and French will be important in the near future. Or any more?
Guest   Mon Aug 25, 2008 7:22 pm GMT
yes.
Breiniak   Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:09 pm GMT
Arabic sucks though, for mostly muslims speak it and nearly ALL muslims are creationist idiots. It sucks to be depended on culturally, scientific and ethically backward nations as Saudi Arabia (public executions at the market are a spectacle on Sunday there)...
Skippy   Mon Aug 25, 2008 11:09 pm GMT
Chinese will certainly become more significant outside of China, but I don't believe it will to the extent that many think it will... Probably about as much as Russian is outside of Russia; in other words, many nations within its sphere of influence may feel like they should learn the language, but English is still the standard of speech between Chinese and English speakers and it doesn't look like that relationship will change much.
Guest   Tue Aug 26, 2008 2:35 am GMT
Chinese (Mandarin) grammar is much easier than Arabic or Hebrew.
JIAJIA   Tue Aug 26, 2008 3:20 am GMT
Mandarin is much easier than Cantonese (dialect), Minanese (dialect), and Wunese (dialect).


1, Cantonese: widely spoken in Hongkong, Macau, and Cantone province, and it's well know because there're many Chinese living in overseas, such as Europe, USA, or southern Asia. Cantonese, IMO, is the secondly difficult dialect of Chinese languages.

2, Minnanese: it's called as Minnanese in Fukkien province of Mainland China, and as Taiwanese in Taiwan. In fact, they're very the same in terms of grammar, syntax, lexical, & pronunciation. Minnanese (Taiwanese), IMO, is the most difficult dialect of Chinese languages, even harder than Cantonese to some extent.

3, Wunese: it's also called Shanghainese, because it's spoken in Shanghai city and surrounding places, but in recent years, Wunese has been on the decline mainly due to that Wunese was deeply affected by Mandarin, but old people still keep speaking Wunese (Shanghainese) in daily conversation. But Mandarin seems to be getting more popular there.

4, Hakka: in fact, it's Hakkanese, only spoken in some mountainous areas of Canton province, & by some overseas Chinese (Hakka people), this dialect had been on grave decline before Hakka people noticed that, so, few foreign people would learn Hakka, they mostly tend to learn Mandarin as the standard Chinese language, and those who're living in Hongkong, Macau, or overseas, like to learn Cantonese as their Chinese language.


By the way, I don't think foreigners have to master about 10,000 Chinese characters to help learning Mandarin, IMO, 3,000 would be good enough for them to master everyday Mandarin, for example, simple newspaper, simple TV programme, simple conversation, and even involves simple controvert. If you don't want to be a Mandarin expert, 10,000 characters seems to be a waste for you, and don't worry at all, because our Chinese Never hear "Thank you very much" wrongly such as "I will rape your wife, and then I will eat your dog", this example sounds really ridiculous & annoying. And the most important thing is that, Mandarin is also being understandable & spoken by those Non-Mandarin speakers, and Mandarin was, is, & will still be the official standard Chinese language of CHINA.
Guest   Tue Aug 26, 2008 3:49 am GMT
Mandarin is much easier than Cantonese (dialect), Minanese (dialect), and Wunese (dialect).


Cantonese is not a dialect, it's the official language of Hong Kong and Macau. People from Peking cannot read a Hong Kong popular magazine because it's written in Cantonese using Cantonese script (based on traditional script but different).
Guest   Tue Aug 26, 2008 3:49 am GMT
Minnanese: => Hokkien
Guest   Tue Aug 26, 2008 3:56 am GMT
《Minnanese: => Hokkien》


Minnanese, (Bn-lm-g), is the language of "Southern Hokkien", Not of the whole Hokkien province. So, Minnanese, or Bn-lm-g is more reasonable.
ralf   Tue Aug 26, 2008 3:59 am GMT
I think Chinese and Arabic will be important but no so much as Western Language.

But what i think is the languages are going to be important denpending of the ECONOMIC BLOCKS, AREAS OR MARKETS.

The world is changing and in the future people will not talk about countries but talk about Economic Areas, Blocks or Markets.
Some economic areas. blocks and markets:

NAFTA: USA, CANADA & MEXICO --- OFFICIAL LANGUAGES : English & Spanish

EU (European Union): Germany, Holland, Belgium, France, Spain, Italy,...... -------OFFIAL LANGUAGES: Germany, English, French, Spanish, Italian,Portugueses,.......

MERCOSUR: ARGENTINA, BRASIL, URUGUAY, PARAGUAY, VENEZUELA------OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE

ASEAN(Association of Southeast Asian Nations):INDONESIA, MALAYSIA, PHILIPPINES, SINGAPORE AND THAILAND-----OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: ENGLISH

APEC (Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation: Australia; Brunei Darussalam; Canada; Chile; People's Republic of China; Hong Kong, China; Indonesia; Japan; Republic of Korea; Malaysia; Mexico; New Zealand; Papua New Guinea; Peru; The Republic of the Philippines; The Russian Federation; Singapore; Chinese Taipei; Thailand; United States of America; Viet Nam.-----OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: ENGLSIH

Caribbean Community (CARICOM): OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: ENGLISH

Greater Arab Free Trade Area (GAFTA):ARABIC COUNTRIES---OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: ARABIC

Central American Common Market (CACM): CENTRAL AMERICA COUNTRIES---- OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: SPANISH

Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA): OFFICIAL LANGUAGE: ENGLISH, FRENCH AND PORTUGUESE

BSEC (Black Sea Cooperation Zone): ALBANIA, ARMENIA, ARZEBAIJIAN, BULGARIA, GEORGIA GREECE, MOLDOVA, ROMANIA, RUSSIA, TURKEY, UKRAINE---OFFICAL LANGUAGE: ENGLISH AND RUSSIAN

ECOWAS (Economic Community of West Africa): OFFFIAL LANGUAGES: ENGLISH, FRENCH AND PORTUGUESE

EAEZ (East Asian Economic Zone): JAPAN, CHINA, KOREA, RUSSIA AND ASEAN ORGANISATION----OFFICIAL LANGUAGES: ENGLISH, CHINESE, JAPANESE AND KOREAN.

There area more but we can say those are the most important.
Guest   Tue Aug 26, 2008 4:03 am GMT
<Cantonese is not a dialect, it's the official language of Hong Kong and Macau. People from Peking cannot read a Hong Kong popular magazine because it's written in Cantonese using Cantonese script (based on traditional script but different).>

Actually I confess that Cantonese remains more elements of Classical Chinese than Mandarin does, and Cantonese characters exist in Classical Chinese, but perhaps they don't have those meanings. Some articles, which are written by self-made Cantonese characters, are really Greek to me.