"you people"

Guest   Sun May 20, 2007 3:40 pm GMT
<<Hearing my 10 year old sister address my mum and dad (and my Nan and granddad for that matter) not only does not sound right, to me, but also sounds rude perhaps even disrespectful? My granddad is even quicker to correct her on that one than me!!>>

That should read 'Hearing my 10 year old sister address my mum and dad (and my nan and grandad for that matter) 'AS GUYS', not only does not sound right.........
Lazar   Sun May 20, 2007 4:11 pm GMT
It's not only us North Americans who have strange verbal taboos. Language Log ( http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/003020.html ) recounts an incident in which Tiger Woods used the word "spaz" in reference to his performance. This term is "innocuous playground slang" here in the US, but apparently - I hadn't known until I read this blog post - in Britain it's considered a highly offensive term for mentally handicapped people.
K. T.   Sun May 20, 2007 7:00 pm GMT
I don't know "Guest's" location, but "mental retardation" is still used. I know, because I work in the medical field. I don't address anyone as "retard", of course. THAT'S offensive. I don't even like typing it.

I've also seen "mentally retarded" or "mental retardation" used within the last six months within the legal community in another state.

I imagine usage depends on location, age of physician and other factors. Travis mentioned "dev. disabled" and I have seen that used as well, but the Kennedy family group was using yet another term.

I haven't quite figured out this forum. It seems there is tension between Spanish-speaking natives and others. Is it an immigration issue?
Antonio   Mon May 21, 2007 5:11 pm GMT
I imagine "Down Syndrome" isnīt very fashionable in English, innit?
Antonio   Mon May 21, 2007 5:23 pm GMT
I mean, Syndrome bearer
Travis   Mon May 21, 2007 5:52 pm GMT
>>I imagine "Down Syndrome" isnīt very fashionable in English, innit?<<

Actually, "Down Syndrome" hasn't gone the way of "retarded" and is still the generally accepted term for such without any newer, competing terms, and is not used in a degratory manner at the present (at least in North American English, that is).
K. T.   Tue May 22, 2007 3:14 am GMT
"Down Syndrome" is still used. "Mongoloid" is not used by any professionals I know, although some people still say this.

Many children with Down Syndrome are leading productive lives.

The issue is using words like "retard" and "stupid".

I think "stupid" is rather mild. "Retard" is insulting.

It's okay to write that Mr. So-and-So has a diagnosis of Mental Retardation with an I. Q. of 70, but it ISN'T okay to call someone a "retard"...
K. T.   Tue May 22, 2007 3:22 am GMT
An IQ of 70 is borderline BTW.

Some people get upset when they hear or read the word "retardation" no matter what the context may be.

This is tricky for me because sometimes I have to interpret and I am not a professional interpreter.
Guest   Tue May 22, 2007 4:43 pm GMT
<<I imagine "Down Syndrome" isnīt very fashionable in English, innit?>>

Is there an "Up Syndrome"? If so, what's it like?
Guest   Tue May 22, 2007 4:45 pm GMT
Other word used to refer to things that synonymous with calling them "stupid" and "retarded" is "lame", as it "that's so lame".
Guest   Tue May 22, 2007 5:46 pm GMT
"Is there an "Up Syndrome"? If so, what's it like?"

Is that an attempt at a joke?
Antonio   Tue May 22, 2007 7:25 pm GMT
Probably a joke.
Mark   Tue May 22, 2007 9:45 pm GMT
Recently read on a message board that Americans think saying "Really" is considered bad manners, is this true.
furrykef   Tue May 22, 2007 11:02 pm GMT
I don't see why that would be true. But, really, it really does tend to be a really overused word. Really.
K. T.   Wed May 23, 2007 12:41 am GMT
THAT was funny!